Rinkins Report: Don King’s Daughter Helps Drug Users Knockout Addiction


How does a person with an affluent upbringing, educational attainment, and a successful executive career, get addicted to drugs? Recovery advocate Deborah King knows the answer first-hand.

“I went to boarding school and graduated from college with honors. I grew up very close to the entertainment arena. I enjoyed the lifestyle, thrill, and living on the edge,” she revealed. “I made the mistake of believing that nothing I paid for could ever control me. I didn’t think it would happen to me. Well, it happened to me.”

If her last name sounds familiar, it’s because she is the daughter of legendary boxing promoter of Don King and his late wife Henrietta. A charmed life of privilege, notwithstanding, King still found herself addicted to substances for over five years.

“My mother was very grounded and my father was flamboyant. They raised me with a can-do attitude. So, I had a good upbringing and family support,” she shared. “I became an addict during my 40’s, after I had been married and had children. That’s when the drama started.”

The 54-year old advocate asserts she is much more than Don King’s baby girl.

“I am a survivor, an advocate, and ambassador for recovery. I love life and I am honored to be a child of God. Without my faith, I would not have made it,” she affirmed.

Deborah 'Debbie' King speaks at Miami-Dade County Teen Court for National Recovery Month and National Substance Abuse Prevention Month sharing her story victory and recovery. Credit: Johnny Louis

Deborah King speaks at Miami-Dade County Teen Court for National Recovery Month and National Substance Abuse Prevention Month sharing her story victory and recovery. Credit: Johnny Louis

After realizing her own recovery, King pushed past guilt and decided to educate herself to help others by earning a graduate degree in counseling. She also founded Limitless Life Recovery and Holistic Group.

“I understand that there are underlying issues that lead people to self-medicate and use substances. Many times those things go hand and hand,” she said. “So, I dedicated myself to educating myself so that I could facilitate recovery for other.”