The ‘Woman,’ The ‘Mother’ of Humanity Must Have ‘EQUAL RIGHTS’


Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

“The cause of the slave has been peculiarly woman’s cause.” Frederick Douglass

A large number of women supported abolition, and most men believed it was women’s high moral standards and their tender hearts that the two monumental reform movements came into being. The abolition of slavery and women's suffrage, the two movements inescapably tied together, both sought to secure the American promise of liberty and equality for all people. Abolition was the mother of the suffrage movement.

NOW IS THE TIME FOR THE NATION TO FULFILL ITS PROMISE.

We the people, white and black alike should never forget the woman. Because of her courage and high moral standards and her tender heart, she defied the evil misguided way of life system of slavery during a time when social standing, race, and gender defined a person's place in society. Courageous women were involved in the common cause and dared to fight for freedom and equality.

Equality before the law without distinction of sex or color.

Now is the time for the nation to fulfill its promise.

EQUALITY BEFORE THE LAW WITHOUT DISTINCTION OF SEX OR COLOR.

Sojourner Truth was the first African-American woman to make public speeches about the connection between the rights of slaves and the rights of women.

Harriet Tubman escaped slavery to become a leading abolitionist. She led hundreds of enslaved people to freedom along the route of the Underground Railroad.

Her torch was inherited by other women, Mary Church Terrell, the daughter of slaves, spoke out against lynching and campaigned for human rights. She became an advocate for women's rights and joined the National Women's Party in picketing the White House.

While most of the courageous pioneers involved in the abolitionist and suffrage movements saw some of the fruition of their efforts, they knew the fight had just begun; though the 13th Amendment outlawed slavery in 1865 and the 19th gave women the right to vote, the struggle for equality continues to the present day.

Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, ran for Congress in 1866. Carrie Chapman Catt, Anne Dallas Dudley founded the Nashville Equal Suffrage League in 1911.

ELIZABETH CADY STANTON DECLARATION OF SENTIMENTS STILL STANDS AS THE TORCH OF WOMEN FREEDOM

Sojourner Truth, born into slavery, became free to fight for women's rights.

Inez Milholland Boissevain rode a horse for hours in the March 13, 1913 Suffrage Parade in Washington DC, the first of four mounted parades. She collapsed October 23, 1916 while giving a speech for women's rights. While she was collapsing, she exclaimed, “President Wilson, how long must, how long must, how long must women wait for liberty?” Inez died a few weeks later from leukemia. Her